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Thalia's Musings

Thalia’s Musings is narrated by Thalia, the Muse of Comedy, as she observes the comedy, drama, and tragedy of the ancient Greek pantheon. But when Thalia becomes more than an observer, the Fates take notice. Are Thalia’s powers limited to helping mortal playwrights hack out a comedy sketch, or can she create happy endings in real life, even for the gods? The Fates want to know.

In the first volume, A Snag in the Tapestry, Thalia and her eight sisters have been ordered by Zeus to leave their home on Mt. Helicon and move to Mt. Parnassus under the governorship of the god Apollo. When Thalia and Apollo raise a cursed nymph from the dead, Thalia starts to wonder if the Muses have greater powers than anyone realized. The Fates, threatened by this possibility, put her to a test. But Thalia cares less about the Fates’ games than the behind-the-scenes drama of the Olympian royal court. Why did Apollo kill the Cyclops, Zeus’ minion? Why did Zeus give Apollo such a light sentence? And with the Cyclops dead, who will resupply Zeus’ lightning bolts when they run out? Will Hera then make her move for Zeus’ throne, or will she be too busy torturing his latest paramour? And what will happen to the Muses when said paramour is one of them?

In the second volume, Snarled Threads, Thalia is given a new test: she must use her powers to bring about a happy ending for the goddess Athena and her beloved Artemis. But the Fates have decreed that Athena, the Goddess of Wisdom, will never be compromised by Love. When a huntress accuses Artemis of impregnating her, Thalia fears this turn of events is the Fates’ judgment. Meanwhile, Thalia has her own problems as the young demigod Adonis captures the affections of both Aphrodite and Apollo.

In the third volume, Unraveled, it’s been two years since Thalia last heard from the Fates. She has a new mission from Athena: keep Beroe, daughter of Adonis and Aphrodite, alive. Poseidon wants to make Beroe his new queen and use her as leverage to gain a seat at Zeus’ court. Dionysus wants to marry Beroe and give her a life of hedonistic bliss in his forest. Beroe wants to battle for her own hand and join Artemis’ hunters. And Zeus wants Beroe out of the way because she holds the memories of the dead and claims she’s seen him kill Hera. All the more reason for Thalia to keep a secret she’s discovered: Hera’s in love. With the mortal King Ixion. And they may have been set up by Athena. Can Thalia save the people she cares about from becoming collateral damage in Athena’s revolution? Will the revolution succeed before everything comes unraveled?

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